Understanding OSHA’s New Guidance on Recording COVID-19 Cases and Related Employee Privacy Concerns

On April 10, 2020, OSHA issued additional guidance for employers on their obligations to record COVID-19 cases which can be found here.

Prior to this guidance, OSHA made clear that COVID-19 cases may be recordable if a worker is infected as a result of performing work-related duties. Thus, employers would need to record COVID-19 cases if all of the following conditions are met:

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Settling an OSHA Citation with Enhanced Abatements? Consider Potential COVID-19 Implications

It is not unusual for OSHA to request “enhanced abatements” when resolving citations. Enhanced abatement is when an employer agrees to perform certain abatement actions beyond the recognized hazard in the specifically cited standard. For example, if an employer receives a machine guarding citation for failure to guard machine A, OSHA may request the employer perform a corporate-wide guarding audit for all equipment in addition to guarding machine A. Other common examples of enhanced abatement include committing to performing future employee training at all facilities in applicable areas or agreeing to conduct safety and health audits with OSHA’s consultation branch or an independent safety and health firm.

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Addressing an Epidemic in the Workplace: Best Practices and Legal Considerations

As the evolving coronavirus virus (COVID-19) first discovered in China continues to grow in both China and other countries including the United States, businesses here need to consider a number of factors in preparing a response plan. One of the most challenging issues in dealing with any epidemic affecting the workplace is that there is no one-size-fits-all approach. A multitude of factors needs to be considering in formulating an appropriate response plan including but not limited to the nature of the epidemic, size of the business, the specific industry, the demographics of the workforce, and operational needs. In addition, there are numerous laws which must be carefully considered in any response plan such as OSHA, Title VII, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) to name just a few. 

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